Category Archives: Primary Grades

This category of recommendations would work well with students from Kindergarten to about the third grade.

Growth Mindset Clips for Young Students

mojoI got this link from the Twitter feed of my pal Sid de Haan. From the site: “Introduce your students to the idea of a Growth Mindset. The simple idea that your brain is like a muscle is proven to have profound impact on learning!
Watch the video with students – they’ll love the story and identify with Mojo’s struggle. The video ends with a question, leading right into a class discussion.”

It seemed a bit contrived but when I watched it a second time, I have to wonder, “Are our young students hearing these messages enough?” They’re not just propping kids’ egos up on clouds but giving them substance to think about. What do you think? There are five short clips in this collection.


The URL: https://ideas.classdojo.com/i/growth-mindset-1

Needs of Plants and Animals (Grade 1 and High School)

neesdsWell, I guess it’s been a while since my last post! I don’t want to say that The Teacher List is done but I do reflect on how it has served its purpose over the last many years. My options are to a) redouble my efforts to pass on useful no-cost sites for teachers, b) wrap it up and move on to other projects, or c) keep it open to share only those resources that I think are exceptional, however frequently that may happen. I’m going to take the summer to think things over and make a decision in the fall.

I do have another collaborative project to share with you before we all break for the summer! There are two classes involved. The first is a Grade One class from Pollard Meadows School in Edmonton, taught by Sean Colling. The other is a Communication Technology 10 class from W.P. Wagner High School in East Edmonton, taught by me. This project is a pairing of two completely different programs. The Grade 1’s are studying the Needs of Animals and Plants — about living things and what they need to live and grow. The high school students are studying Animation. They had just completed a course using Adobe Flash to create vector drawings and movement called tweens. Many of their lessons are steeped in learning how to be a freelance print and web designer. The Scenario: The Grade One class (the Clients) have hired the high school class (the Freelancers) to animate their drawings. The students were paired up and assigned a blog post in which they were able to have a conversation in the comment section. The Freelancers asked the Clients how they wanted their drawings to be animated. They were not allowed to change the artwork in any way; it would be like changing a client’s logo! We hope you enjoy the results below. Be sure to read the comments in each blog post to get a feel for how well the two groups communicated without meeting in person.


The URL: https://sites.google.com/a/epsb.ca/needs-of-plants-and-animals

Have a wonderful summer break and we’ll catch up in the fall!
-Pete

Winter Traditions Collaboration (Grade 1 and High School)

Winter_TraditionsToday, my new friend, Brenda Cleland and I wrapped up a collaborative project that my ComTech 10 class and her Grade One class did together. The Grade One class (the Clients) have hired the high school class (the Freelancers) to animate their drawings. The students were paired up and assigned a blog post in which they were able to have a conversation in the comment section. The Freelancers asked the Clients how they wanted their drawings to be animated. They were not allowed to change the artwork in any way; it would be like changing a client’s logo! We hope you enjoy the results below. Be sure to read the comments in each blog post to get a feel for how well the two groups communicated without meeting in person.

The URL: https://sites.google.com/a/epsb.ca/winter-traditions/home

And on that note, Mrs. Teacher List and I wish all of you a very Merry Christmas and all the best in the coming year! Rest well and we’ll connect again in January.
– Pete

Using LEGO to Build Math Concepts

legoEdmonton teacher, Leslie Friesen, passed on this interesting article from Scholastic. The author makes a good case for using the different pieces of the popular Lego sets to illustrate fractions in different ways. There are some printables to help students use the manipulatives. I thought it was good advice given to pre-pack the pieces you need in a bag rather than give the set out.

The URL: http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/top-teaching/2013/12/using-lego-build-math-concepts

Build Your Own Caterpillar

caterpillarHere’s a great activity for younger science students learning about habitat and camouflage. Students are asked to build a caterpillar and to consider different characteristics such as color and spines. Rather than just move through the exercise blindly, students may proceed only once they have entered a response about why they chose that particular feature.

The URL: http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/explorer/ecosystems/be_an_explorer/map/caterpillar_play.htm