CondorWatch

condorwatchSurrey, B.C. teacher, Nicole Painchaud, sent me a note about a Zooniverse project: Condor Watch. From the site: “There are only around 200 California Condors living in the wild and they are in serious danger from lead poisoning, which they get by eating carcasses shot with lead bullets. Getting a better idea of how they interact and socialise is crucial to ongoing conservation efforts. Using camera traps, ecologists in the US have been observing them in the wild. However the sheer volume of images is now overwhelming. Starting today with people’s help they want people to look through the first set of data: 264,000 images of condors eating, socialising, and nesting. Ecologists need everyone’s help to identify the individual birds from their numbered tags. Your efforts on this project will help preserve an endangered species – and we think that’s really special.” There are several educational resources on the site and students are encouraged to participate in analyzing the photographs.

The URL: http://www.condorwatch.org/

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Diefenbunker: Canada’s Cold War Museum

DiefenbunkerI heard from Lara Lavelle a couple of weeks ago. She’s the Interpretive Planning Assistant for the project, Diefenbunker: Canada’s Cold War Museum in Ottawa. She had information on an exciting new project that teaches students about the Cold War Era. Lara goes on to say, “We are excited to announce the recent completion of My Project
Berlin, which makes original, curriculum-relevant lesson plans and projects available online and free of charge to teachers across the country.” The projects will provide teachers with the option to have their students’ work featured in an upcoming exhibit at the museum, and connect with other classes from across the country via Twitter and other online media.

The URL: http://diefenbunker.ca/my-project-berlin/

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Adobe Education Exchange

adobeedexSome might say that I have a bit of a bias towards Adobe’s products in my work. (Mrs. Teacher List thinks it’s more than ‘a bit’…) We are all used to the big tech companies having influence in our lives. When they start to pay attention to Education, it often is more helpful to teachers and students than not. That’s why I thought I’d put Adobe’s Education Exchange up as today’s recommendation. Adobe EdEx, as the cool kids call it, offers no-charge resources, expert educators, lively discussions, and PD workshops. If you are using Adobe’s Creative Cloud or CS6 in your teaching practice, it is well worth a look.

The URL: http://edex.adobe.com

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Next Vista For Learning

Next_Vista_for_LearningNext Vista For Learning provides a library of free videos made by and for teachers and students everywhere. All content is licensed underCreative Commons Attribution. I’m not sure where I first saw this but there are over 1250 videos in this growing collection. I didn’t have a lot of luck hitting a topic in the search function but when I browsed the categories, I found plenty that I could graze through.

The URL: http://www.nextvista.org

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